Department of Climate Change

WHEREAS Canadians are experiencing an apparent increase in extreme weather events and natural disasters and reacting to them on an individual basis; and

WHEREAS there is a growing international consensus that changes in the global climate is a contributing factor to such events; and

WHEREAS analyzing these events to determine if there are common causes that shed light on methods of mitigation or ways to avoid these extreme weather events; and

WHEREAS research and data-gathering on climate change is ongoing in  numerous government agencies and departments and in various universities and other public and private institutions, there is no central repository and the lessons learned are not being appropriately analyzed or addressed; and

WHEREAS aggressively attacking climate change will lead to new technologies and new jobs; therefore

BE IT RESOLVED that a Liberal government create a Department of Climate Change to focus Canada’s efforts toward understanding and addressing the potential impacts of climate change, including extreme weather events and to promote municipal, regional, provincial and industrial opportunities that will arise therefrom.

Senior Liberals’ Commission

5 Responses to “Department of Climate Change”

  1. Jim Collinson 11. Feb, 2014 at 5:16 pm #

    I don’t think a separate department is the answer. What is needed is an “overview” arrangement, perhaps a Cabinet Committee with it’s own Secretariat that can coordinate information, involve departments in working together on areas of common interest, and develop approaches for avoidance/adaptation as well as amelioration. It involves a long term vision for a very different Canada than now: one with a different Arctic shoreline, a ore open Northwest Passage, a potentially viable Port of Churchill and a major research initiative to address air, water and soil pollution in the oils sands development area. It also means new approaches to energy over time. Virtually all departments have roles to play, but a central agency, perhaps with regional offices, will be needed to coordinate and guide the process.

  2. Jim Collinson 11. Feb, 2014 at 5:19 pm #

    I don’t think a separate department is the answer. What is needed is an “overview” arrangement, perhaps a Cabinet Committee with it’s own Secretariat that can coordinate information, involve departments in working together on areas of common interest, and develop approaches for avoidance/adaptation as well as amelioration. It involves a long term vision for a very different Canada than now: one with a different Arctic shoreline, a more open Northwest Passage, a potentially viable Port of Churchill and a major research initiative to address air, water and soil pollution in the oils sands development area. It also means new approaches to energy over time. Virtually all departments have roles to play, but a central agency, perhaps with regional offices, will be needed to coordinate and guide the process.

  3. rent@xplornet.ca_1 11. Feb, 2014 at 8:31 pm #

    Agree with restoring data gathering as it applies to climate change.

  4. John Dunn 11. Feb, 2014 at 10:12 pm #

    We must reduce carbon emissions and focus on reducing use of fossil fuels. Reducing speed limits on highways wold be a start. Fuel consumption rises exponentially with increased speeds. 90 km/h would be a good start.

  5. Lois McGrattan 11. Feb, 2014 at 10:18 pm #

    It seems that our present government is funding less in these areas and also not allowing scientists to publish their work. Very strange I think.

    We need to pay more attention to what is happening to our weather, and other areas of concern. We have the talent in this Country to fill these jobs and keep everyone informed so that steps can be taken to improve conditions not just for us but other countries.

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